4 Most Common Sewing Machine Stitches

4 Most Common Sewing Machine Stitches

When it comes to learning how to sew, you have two options available. You can choose to sew by hand or use a machine to do it. The latter option allows you to work more quickly and it typically creates stronger stitches, especially if you aren’t accustomed to doing the job by hand. Some people actually prefer to sew by hand, but most find that they really love using a machine once they get the hang of it. If you decide to learn how to sew using a machine, there are four basic sewing machine stitches that you will need to learn to start. With these stitches, you can sew practically anything. And, more importantly, you can make sure that the stitches you make will last for many years.

4 Most Common Sewing Machine Stitches

Straight Stitch

This is the stitch you’re most likely to see on clothing and other projects. Just as the name implies, the stitch is made in a straight line without any noticeable variation. You see this stitch on seams, so it’s probably the one you’re most familiar with. It’s also a great place to start, as it’s one of the easiest stitches to sew. Without a doubt, it’s one of the most, if not the most, common stitch there is. You will use this stitch more than most of the other stitches you will eventually learn. If you’re worried about keeping the line straight, you can relax. It’s a lot easier to do with a machine than it is to sew a straight line by hand.

4 Most Common Sewing Machine Stitches

Zigzag Stitch

If you’re wondering how this stitch looks once it’s completed, the name accurately describes it. It’s a common stitch because it gives you the chance to make a stitch that has some extra strength to it, and it’s practical. If you want to sew buttons on an article of clothing or sew on some embroidery, this is the stitch you will be using. It’s extremely common because it works well and it’s easy to do. Instead of making the straight stitch, you will create a zigzag pattern around an object. This type of stitch is much more likely to hold and remain intact indefinitely, which is why it’s almost always used to secure an object onto clothing or other materials.

4 Most Common Sewing Machine Stitches

Overlock Stitch

This is another stitch you might see on clothing. Often, you find it on the hemline of pants. If you wonder how it looks, the finished stitch resembles two straight stitches, one on the top and one on the bottom, with stitched squares in between the two lines – similar to a ladder shape. This sounds complicated, but it’s quite easy.

All you need is a modern sewing machine that can make the stitch. Most of them can do it in a single pass, thanks to some smart programming. If you’re using an older machine where everything must be set up by hand, you may have to work a little harder to perfect this stitch. It’s an important stitch that you learn how to do it because it is so common. Once you get used to it, you’ll find that you can consistently make the stitch without any problems.

4 Most Common Sewing Machine Stitches

Blind Hem

When you don’t see an overlock stitch on a hem, this is the stitch that will probably take its place. Just as the name indicates, the hem is designed to be extremely difficult to see. It works well for certain fabrics of a delicate nature, especially when the presence of a hemline would be undesirable. As a result, it’s one of the more common stitches you’re likely to find. To make it, you simply make three consecutive stitches in a straight line, then change the angle of the stitches to create a “V” pattern. This sequence is repeated throughout the entire stitch. As is the case with the overlock stitch, most modern machines can be programmed to make the stitch automatically. If you’re controlling the machine manually, it’s still one of the easiest stitches to make. However, it does require you to pay attention to avoid missing a stitch.

There are many more types of stitches in addition to these four, but if you learn these, you can learn the rest as you become more proficient. Since these are the stitches you’re most likely to use, it’s best to learn them first. If you do, you’ll be able to sew practically anything you want.